Monday, 17 May 2010

Unit 6- Spores Arriving Pre-vis *3

After today going to uni and have a good talk with Phil, He opened my eyes to what actually i'm trying to depict, a sci-fi Invasion film inside the life cycle of the mushroom, so all the camera work and all the actual animation should contribute for it. Once again, Phil gave me an eye opener, and I was able to see what was going wrong with my 2 previous pre-viz.
So after the talk, I rushed home and redid the pre-vis, by changing the camera movement and position, I created a more mysterious and dynamic scene therefore think i'm going the right way with it.
Also, the new episodes (Pre-viz) will be delivered later today I hope :) If Maya lets me.


7 comments:

Jack Stevenson said...

looking good man, only thing id suggest is let the spore move more, let it break the boundaries of the res gate a little, perhaps so the camera can see in front of the spore and where its going. almost as if the camera is the secondary motion.

tutorphil said...

okay Rubes - all this fiddling will be worth it - SO - I honestly believe that you should get rid of the other spores - they pose too many questions at this stage of the story and still take my attention from the major spore. Also - and don't hate me :-) - but now that we're only looking at one element, the camera work slows the descent of the spore and kills the dynamism; I think less is going to be more here - after all, what you want is a film that starts with the sudden arrival of the spore (comet/meteor); if I was filming this for 'real' - my camera would be on the ground pointed up straight into the dark sky - out the darkness, the spore would fall and I would simply track its descent (spore starts as a bright, glowing speck getting larger and larger) until it SLAMMED into the ground a few metres away from my position - WHACK - therefore, the camera movement would be a tracking shot from a fixed position - until the moment it started to sink, at which point you'd pull back to get the camera in the right position for the sinking sequence. I know it must feel as if you're bouncing around between feedback suggestions, and I know it was my original suggestion that you track the spore, but that was when there were multiple spores and the staging was unclear; try this 'less is more' approach - a big black 16:9 sky, a falling star that falls towards the camera and simple tracking shot as it 'arrives' and then, as it begins to sink - a clean, slow track backwards...

ivanka kutilkova said...

I agree with the camera pointing up in the sky and seeing the spore getting closer and closer... Like I never told him LOL.

Ruben Alexandre said...

Ok Phil, I will try that approach, it is simple and effective.. Ill do it quickly.


@Ivana
I'm sorry, for not listening!!

tutorphil said...

oh no - Ivana and Tutorphil in cahoots! :-) It's a conspiracy!

Ruben Alexandre said...

Anyway, Phil, I just need to get used to be versatile at the point if a client want me to change anything, I'm able to do it quickly...

tutorphil said...

actually, what you need to do is to be able to crystallise your intent more quickly - and with greater confidence; the difficulty of this first scene is coming from an uncertainty of intention; I experience it when I'm writing something, but I'm not quite ready to write it yet - and usually this is because the idea hasn't 'cooked' properly; I think perhaps that only today the real 'through-line' of your idea became clear - and sometimes it has to be like that - difficult - to make it happen. But DON'T stay up all night, Rubes!